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Muscle Loss: The Facts

Discussion in 'Training' started by Zillagreybeard, May 01, 2020.
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Zillagreybeard
Zillagreybeard
Participant
572 posts
  • May 01, 2020
  • 0

Muscle Loss: The Facts – Taking a few weeks off of training will not negatively impact your gains. If you stop lifting entirely for a few weeks, yes, you may lose some size. But once you get back into your regular gym routine and stay consistent with it, you’ll ultimately end up at net zero loss in gains. You may even see an increase in growth beyond your pre-detraining levels.
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One study concluded that a 3-week detraining break followed by a 6-week retraining cycle yielded similar muscle hypertrophy in men compared to 24 weeks of continuous resistance training. When taking time off from lifting for a short period of time, your muscle mass levels don’t revert back to where they were pre-lifting. Moreover, if the retraining phase is longer than the detraining period (e.g. 3 weeks detraining followed by 6 weeks retraining), mass may ultimately increase.
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How Much is Enough? – Another study tested the minimum dose required to maintain resistance training-induced adaptations. They found that training once per week was sufficient to maintain positive neuromuscular adaptations. This means that maintaining muscle mass is actually fairly easy as long as you’re getting in a little bit of training.
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What about when you don’t have access to your regular equipment? Perhaps you do have some resistance bands and lighter dumbbells (and your own bodyweight). Remember that your muscles don’t know what exercise you’re doing; they only know the mechanical stimuli placed on them. So, if you can make a workout sufficiently challenging, you can absolutely maintain your current level of muscle mass, at the very least.
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Bodyweight workouts – or sessions with minimal equipment – are certainly better than nothing, and some mechanical stimulus is absolutely better than nothing at all. –

Durro
Durro
Participant
123 posts
  • May 02, 2020
  • 0

I take 9-11 days away from working out. Several times a year. I’ve been doing this for some years now. Yes at first I was scared of losing size/muscle I had that mentality of I will get small, I will shrink! But by day five I do have less fullness and my appetite is down so I do eat a little less but as soon as I start working out again Bammmm 💥 the fullness and size comes back! Like said above I’m bigger and rested ready to attack the weights! Time away is good!

AdVisor
AdVisor
Moderator
231 posts
  • May 03, 2020
  • 0

I’m not one to take of much from the gym usually only do it because of injury. With the gyms closing I’ve had very little motivation even with a home gym I’m only half-ass training once a week. I’m about to pick it up here this week and might start cycle next week. My body did need some rest so it has worked out good

Zillagreybeard
Zillagreybeard
Participant
572 posts
  • May 11, 2020
  • 0

I have been taking this as a much needed break from the gym.  Letting this old body rest and heal up and waiting to hit it hard when things open back up.  Planning my attack as I type.

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